The Color “Blue”

“But Melanctha Herbert never really killed herself because she was so blue, though often she thought this would be really the best way for her to do. Melanctha never killed herself, she only got a bad fever and went into the hospital where they took good care of her and cured her” (Stein 141).

Stein, Gertrude. “Melanctha.” Three lives. New York: Dover Publications, 1994. 64-65. Print.

The use of the color “blue” to define one’s emotion and feelings is interesting because in the novel “blue” is known to refer to depression and it foreshadows the death that will overcome Melanctha due to the accumulation of stress and emotional turmoil within her. The color “blue” also reminds me of one of the pictures we saw in class. To be specific the Seated Harlequin picture as the person was wearing a blue and black checkered pattern clothing and the person had no emotions and we mentioned in class that on the surface it is unclear to know what the person is feeling unless we look in depth and Melanctha’s character is so hard to figure out without closely examining her. In the start she does not seem to be one filled with depression but as the novel progresses one can realize how emotionally burdened she is and the Seated Harlequin picture has the same result as I continue to look at the portrait the person sitting looks more and more emotionally burdened and depressed.