Tag Archives: love

Free Heart

“‘Death alone can help that dog,’ cried the ribbon-seller, looking after it with a sigh. ‘What can we do with a creature who returns to his doom with such a free heart?'”

 

Narayan, R.K. “The Blond Dog.” Malgudi Days. New York: Penguin Classics, 2006. Print. pp 39

 

I find this passage extremely interesting where the ribbon-seller wants the dog so badly to live freely just as the dog’s heart as. It reminds us that all people return to “their doom” or their death at the end and not everyone deserves to do so so early. Why do those who do so many great things and are so free suffer the most?

The beauty of newness in a bees life.

“She saw a dust-bearing bee sink into the sanctum of a bloom; the thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight. So this was a marriage! She had been summoned to behold a revelation.” (11)

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

This appears to be the very moment that Janie realizes what she wants out of life. Unfortunately, while the intensity of this moment is one that we often find in new love, she will one day find that it wavers with age and only becomes stale and bland. Beautiful imagery though! Interestingly, Hurston uses a bee to create this moment of realization, when the bee itself would never live long enough to lose that feeling of newness.

Jewel’s Love

“‘Eat’, he says. “Get the goddamn stuff out of sight while you got a chance, you pussel-gutted bastard. You sweet son of a bitch,” he says”

Faulkner, William. As I Lay Dying: The Corrected Text. First Vintage International Edition.         New York: Vintage Books, 1990. Print.

Knowing that Jewel’s most prized possession is his horse that he worked so hard for, his way of speaking to his horse seems strange. How he deals with the emotions of love and caring is much different than his brothers and most people in general. His differences from his brothers establish him as a loner.

Jewel: Mom and I

“If it had just been me when Cash fell off of that church and if it had just been me when pa laid sick with that load of wood fell on him, it would not be happening with every bastard in the country coming in to stare at her because if there is a God what the hell is He for. It would just be me and her on a high hill and me rolling the rocks down the hill at their faces, picking them up and throwing them down the hill faces and teeth and all by God until she was quiet and not that goddamn adze going One lick less. One lick less and we could be quiet”

Faulkner, William. “As I Lay Dying”. New York. The Modern Library Edition. 2000. p.15  Print.

This passage portrays the narration of Jewel, who seems to be especially more attached to his mother. He is bothered by the fact that Cash is making his mother’s coffin where she can “see” it. He does not want everyone to be with his mother and just wishes to be alone with her. Faulkner uses specific terms to portray his frustration and writes the sentence in ways to portray just how much he was attached to his mother.

“That’s what they mean by the love that passeth understanding: that pride, that furious desire to hide that abject nakedness which we bring here with us, carry with us into operating rooms,carry stubbornly and furiously with us into the earth again”.

Faulkner, William. As I Lay Dying: The Corrected Text. New York: Modern Library, 2000. Print.

When reading this passage I felt an overwhelming sense of passion, judgement, and love. The book itself is not moralistic but I felt this passage revealed a sense of values and a very consciousness of them always being aware of their values. They are carried everywhere and their lives can be interpreted by the values they carry with them.

Mrs.Dalloway

“But this question of love (she thought, putting her coat away), this falling in love with women. Take Sally Seton; her relation in the old days with Sally Seton. Had not that, after all, been love?”

Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway. New York: Harcourt Inc., 1925

Here again, as we can see it several times in the novel, it’s interesting and still surprising  to see how casually an important question -if she loved a woman- followed by memories, comes to Clarissa’s mind just as she comes home and gets off her coat.

 

Mother & Babies

“The worst, he said, were the women with dead babies. You couldn’t get the women to give up their dead babies. They’d have babies dead for six days. Wouldn’t give them up. Nothing you could do about it”

E. Hemingway. In Our Time. “On the Quai at Smyrna”. New York: Scribner. 2003. Print. p.11

This passage depicts the relationship of mothers and their children. It is both a horrifying and a loving portrayal about mothers and their babies. It is horrifying because they are holding onto the body of their babies that no longer live; however, it is also loving because they cannot separate from the beings they gave life to. This was an interesting passage because it suggest such a strong bond between mothers and their children.

Love? Really?

“Yes I love you Jeff, how often you want me to tell you. Oh you so stupid Jeff, but yes I love you. Now I won’t say it no more now tonight Jeff, you hear me. You just be good Jeff now to me or else I certainly get awful angry with you. Yes I love you, sure, Jeff, though you don’t any way deserve it from me.”

Stein, Gertrude. “Melanctha.” Three lives. Dover Publications, New York. 1994. 104. Print

I don’t think either of them really loves the other, the way love is meant to be. They have never been what the other really wants, and it seems as though they are just trying something on for size.

 

 

Jeff and The Reader trying to understand Melanctha

“‘Sometimes I certainly don’t rightly see Melanctha, how much more game that is than just the ordinary kind of holler.’ ‘No, Jeff Campbell, and made the way you is you certainly ain’t likely ever to be much more understanding.’ ‘No, Melanctha, nor you neither. You think always, you are the only one who ever can do any way to really suffer.'”

Stein, Gertrude. “Melanctha.” Three Lives. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 1994. 106. Print.

The first thing that is worth noticing about this section of dialogue between Melanctha and Jeff is Stein’s emphasis on their inability to understand each other. Stein constantly portrays Melanctha as stubbornly insisting that she is right, yet we never know what she is truly feeling. On the other hand, the reader actually does hear Jeff’s thoughts, and we can understand his own doubts and assurances as they come and go. Therefore, the lack of understanding between Jeff and Melanctha is actually more focused on the reader’s inability to understand Melanctha and what Melanctha wants–we have the same struggle as Jeff.
This specific portion of dialogue, Jeff is expressing to Melanctha how he has very little reverence for her type of “bravery” or “suffering,” in which she constantly allows herself to be hurt and then “hollers” about it. He calls it the “ordinary kind of holler,” trying to show her that she is no more brave or understanding than people who provoke fights and trouble, only to later regret it. These sentiments seem to attack the core of what Melanctha wants: “excitement,” something Jeff believes blacks should stay away from. However, Melanctha refuses to accept these sentiments, insisting that Jeff is just of a different “way” and therefore he can’t be “understanding.” This idea that one must be a certain “way” to really understand and to really suffer is one of the tensions between Jeff and Melanctha: Jeff, while living his regular life, did not know how to suffer until he comes into contact with Melanctha, whose strong emotional ways teach him to suffer. While the reader can see the harsh effects of Melanctha’s ways on Jefferson, we are not sure if Melanctha is changed by Jeff.